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19

That does not list the beneficiaries, it lists the people to whom probate was granted, which is the executors of the will. If there had been no will, or if they were not the named executors, then it would say that letters of administration had been granted instead. In either case that is the people in charge of administering the estate not the people that ...


19

The obvious thing to check is whether the other children had died prior to the will being drawn up. Transcription To help you in this case, I have transcribed the will below: Extracted from the Registry of the Prerogative Court of York This is the Last Will and Testament of me Robert Fowler of Thorganby in the county of York farmer made this ...


16

As Tom says in his answer, the people mentioned are the executors of the estate. The record you are looking at is the National Probate Calendar, which is basically a detailed index of probate and administration records each year. You can order a copy of the actual will, which will usually give much more detailed information on legacies and beneficiaries. A ...


13

It says "Doth Ordayne" as in "I doeth Ordain this my Last Will and Testament" example - William Shakespeare's Will of 1616 - "I, William Shackspeare of Stratford-upon-Avon in the county of Warwick, gent., in perfect health and memory, God be praised, do make and ordain this my last will and testament"


11

It's "And" with a capital "A" ! Your "s" is clearly(?) the same as the "d" in "and" Your "u" could just as easily be an "n" - these are notoriously easy to confuse. Your "et" is one letter, "A" - the second "etus" is actually clearer that the "et" is one letter. It doesn't help that they omit punctuation, does it?


10

This answer is based on my experience with English probate records. While the probate process in the British colonies differed from that of the colonial power, the process was no doubt modelled on its British counterpart. In England, it was customary for the testator to mention all his children in his will such that it was clear that none had been forgotten....


8

The Said Eunice Strong shall pay one third for the support & education of Lucy Strong and Julia C Strong until they are eighteen years of age and the remaining two thirds for their support to be paid out of the remaining two thirds of the property in proportion as received by the others heirs I give and bequeath unto my eleven children Elisha N ...


8

Here are some links to handwriting tutorials and other articles to help you get started: Palaeography: reading old handwriting 1500 - 1800: A practical online tutorial from The National Archives (UK) Script Tutorial: making sense of old handwriting from Brigham Young University a website for the course Early-Modern Palaeography at the University of ...


7

The "widow's third" was a portion of a man's estate guaranteed to his wife after his death, regardless of what his will stated. This excerpt from "Material Culture in America: Understanding Everyday Life" (Google Books Link) describes the concept: Known also as the "widow's portion" or "widow's third", a widow's right of dower was ... a legal practice in ....


6

0 (i.e. born before 20 Mar 1824). Anyone can be left a bequest in a will regardless of age - 1 day old or 100 years old. They need not even be born yet to be left a legacy. A will may or may not stipulate how the bequest should be handled in cases where the legatee is a minor. In those cases, the legacy may be paid out, for example, at age 21 or at marriage,...


6

"CH" refers to CHarles County, Maryland. "A" (meaning "account") can be found in these documents: "Abstracts of the Administration Accounts of the Prerogative Court; (multiple editions, called "Libers," see "Sources" below); V. L. Skinner, Jr. "D" stands for "deed." The numbers (5.150, for instance) come from the "Charles County Maryland Probate Records, ...


6

...the said share and an insurance of Two pounds and Sixteen shillings... ...(and the receipt of which Alfred born... ...for their own respective use the said share... I agree with the other bolded words.


6

If you go to the Parish page for Illogan: https://www.opc-cornwall.org/Par_new/h_k/illogan.php and scroll down to the Wills section, you will find both grants of probate have been transcribed. The first, listed as "Clement UREN", is the grant of 10 July 1747. The second, listed as "Clement UREN, other copy void", is the grant of probate from 30 Sept ...


5

I'm sorry to say that the wording in the will certainly isn't something you can rely on to tell you the age of children mentioned in wills in the 18th and early 19th centuries. I have a couple of ancestors that left wills in the late 18th and early 19th centuries where they mention children who were adults and also children who were minors. In neither case ...


5

The word is "comon", and was used here as an abbreviation of the word "commission". The phrase: "... to whom administration was granted having been sworn by commission duly to administer." being a standard one in wills of that period. This not an unusual abbreviation in this context, although personally I have found the ...


4

I think Jan has an excellent response for actually reading the will, but I will put out another solution or if anything supplementary information that you still may need after you read the will. There are other ways to determine the core question " I am trying to work out what land he owned and where it went when he died." you are attempting to gain an ...


4

I read it simply as do this day. Thus some sort of contraction of Do this day make this, my last will and testament. I have a couple of wills from that area of Dorset from just after 1700. They use very similar phraseology.


4

Somerset wills were sadly kept with Devon wills. See the page on the Somerset archives site where it says "The story of Somerset's wills is a sad one. Having been centralised at Exeter, most of the county's original probate records before 1858 were destroyed by German bombing in 1942, as were those for Devon." The link goes on to list options for finding ...


4

... divided between my children viz Martha Entermarried with Henry Rhinehart, My Son John, Elizabeth Entermarried with William Stevenson, Henry B. Fought, Isaac S. Fought, William E. Fought, Jonathan E. Fought, Mary Jane Fought share and share alike ... and as my son John is now dead and has left a daughter Ann Virginia Fought his share to go to ...


4

Not very helpful but in the two cases where I have acted as the Executor of a will, I would say that the sole documentation generated was: The will itself; The Request for Probate; The information about the estate sent off with(?) the Request for Probate and destined for HM Revenue & Customs so that they knew the size of the estate and how much ...


4

I'll self-answer, as I've made some progress, although not reached a complete conclusion yet. I've learned a couple of things along the way, too: 1) Ancestry's default search doesn't work the way I'd assumed - I thought it would include Soundex matching, but it doesn't. To get thorough "inexact" matching, you have to use the "exact" checkbox - rather ...


4

I have only experience dealing with colonial American wills, but those should be under the same norms as English. I've looked at dozens of wills from New England in the 17th and 18th centuries, and naming the wife, when alive, was definitely the norm. You are correct that coverture is an important consideration, but so too is the right of dower: https://...


3

Wills of people who have died should be at the district court (Amtsgericht), which serves as a Nachlassgericht here. Which court depends on the exact place of living (district). You might use the collection of Berlin directories by the Zentral- und Landesbibliothek Berlin to learn where your grandfather lived. The death certificate should also help. If it ...


3

Kayer = A coarse sieve used to winnow corn (separate large from small) https://books.google.com/books?id=tUYOAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA31&dq=kayer++corn+-layer&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CEgQ6AEwCGoVChMI0ZGO8umbyAIVhFiSCh09Zg62#v=onepage&q=kayer&f=false ----------------------------------------------------- Looms/Lomes = An open vessel of any kind; ...


3

Using Adrian's answer as a springboard, I searched for possible resources. The Devon Wills index formerly at British Origins has now been released at Find My Past. A list of the courts (including the PCC) whose records were used in compiling the index references courts in Dorset and Wiltshire but I don't see anything in the list specifically related to ...


3

I realise this is an old question but as the correct answer has not yet been posted - Section 1 Proved at London the 12t day of Febry 1817 before The Worshipful Richd Henry Creswell Dr of Laws and Surrogate by the Oath of Mary Linley Widow the Relict and other Executor to whom Admon was granted having been first sworn duly to admr. "Admon" is a ...


3

As the earlier answers have said, the probate calendar entries list the executors of the will, who are not necessarily beneficiaries. Having names of non-relatives may be useful for your research as part of the study of a research subject's FAN Club (FAN = friends, associates, neighbors). See QuickLesson 11: Identity Problems & the FAN Principle on ...


3

As regards the value in today's money, one of the problems is that different things have changed in price at different rates. £4949 would have bought you a very nice house in Harrogate at that time; much nicer than you would get for today's equivalent of £195K. (According to one source, the average price of a house in the UK in 1950 was under £2000). And ...


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