27

My answer consists of three parts. I start with World War II because more (individual) records are available and I assume people are more interested in it. The second part focusses on World War I and possible research difficulties. The last part covers projects and institutions providing e.g. information on burial sites and memorials of both wars. World War ...


11

Like all British Army units Casualty Clearing Stations kept war diaries. You can download that for 47 CCS for the relevant (for a small fee) from http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/0bd98c64d2cb44c0b61a9b8f7457ad2f The unit location should be noted, and it can be possible to work it out with some accuracy. CCSs were either in a building, ...


9

I think it is Новоград-Волинський, which is transliterated as Novohrad-Volyns'kyi, Novograd-Volinskiy, etc. and is also known as Zhvil, Zvil, etc. This is in the Zhytomyr Oblast in northern Ukraine. If this is the correct location, unfortunately there are probably no relatives left. I searched on Fold3 for "Swel, Russia" and found two men in the WWII "Old ...


8

I would contact Volksbund, an organization that takes care of German war graves, and Deutsche Dienststelle (WASt), a federal organization maintaining records on servicemen, and ask if it helps to return these tags to them (especially WASt) and provide as much details on the provenance of these tags as possible. They might answer requests based on these ...


8

Update: new information on birth place Let’s sum up what we know for sure: You had a great-grandfather with the surname Rebholz What we assume: He was born in Sigmaringen What is unknown: his first name(s) his birth date his place and date of death You are lucky, the birth and other records from the Standesamt Sigmaringen are available online from ...


8

According to this letter from the Ministry of Pensions to the British Red Cross Society Records Office posted on George Laughead's website The Medical Front WWI, it looks like CCS 47 was indeed in Varennes at that time (near the bottom of the document). The Casualty Clearing Stations list (posted on the website http://www.1914-1918.net) is easier to read: ...


8

Casualties in the Verlustlisten include the following keys and abbreviations: t or † (“tot”) – dead gefallen – killed in action † an seinen schweren Wunden – died because of his serious injuries v. or verw. (“verwundet”) – wounded l.v. (“leicht verwundet”) – slightly wounded s.v. or schw. verw. (“schwer verwundet”) – seriously wounded l.v.b.d.Tr. (“leicht ...


8

You've blurred out the details of what medal it was but looking on Ancestry I can see that it appears to be the 1914–15 Star which was awarded to anybody that served in any theatre between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915 who hadn't received the 1914 Star. It wasn't actually instituted until December 1918 though so it wouldn't have been awarded in his ...


7

This means that he was retained (“zurückgeh.” = “zurückgehalten”) by a neutral country until now (“bish.” = “bisher”), as this list of abbreviations for the navy lists suggests. Now he is prisoner of war (“krgef.” = “kriegsgefangen”). “A” could indicate that this information was received from a foreign country (“Ausland“), as “A.N.” is elsewhere used for “...


7

The uniform is from the time around World War I (see, for instance, World War 1 Uniforms and US Enlisted Uniforms 1900 - 1918: Part 2: Uniform Patterns (Enlisted) Army). The uniform style doesn't indicate the branch of the U.S. Army. The button is called a "collar disc", and the "48" is a unit number, either a regiment or battalion depending on how the ...


7

The Deutsche Dienststelle (WASt) holds Approximately 1.500.000 files (residue) on foreign P.o.Ws. in German custody. (Assets of the Deutsche Dienststelle) I wrote a little bit on using records from the Deutsche Dienststelle in my answer to How to find information on German soldiers from World War I and World War II?. In a nutshell: You’ll send a ...


7

Sectioned using photo orientation in question. German transcript (mis-spellings per original), followed by English translation: [top left] Von Zum An[d]enken 1916 From ___ For remembrance 1916 [bottom] Lieber Richard Hier hast [Du] noch von Vater ein Andenken Vater würde sich auch sehr freuen über Euren kleinen Jungen Dear Richard Here you have a ...


6

There are some sources but they are fragmented and most of them are not digitized yet. One online source about WWI casualties for 1914-1915 years is in the Russian State Library. It's far from being complete, but it's the largest online source I know of. I don't think there are any indexed/searchable sources at all.


6

Update: Since the original question and the early answers were written, John has found out that his great-grandfather was not born in Kreuzlingen, but Sigmaringen, now in Baden-Wurttemberg in Germany. I'll leave my answer as a case study for how to find the birthplace when it is not known, since it also addresses the family story about the Swiss citizenship ...


6

I was thinking perhaps the second initial was a "T", so I did a quick search of the South Australian BDM index (run by GenealogySA) and found a P. T. (Patrick Thomas) Bennett, who seemed about the right 'vintage" for the photo: Given Name(s): Patrick Thomas Last Name: BENNETT Birth Date: 1890, July 17 Gender: M Father: William Patrick BENNETT Mother: ...


6

The 113th infantry regiment was from Baden (Freiburg im Breisgau). The garrison for the 113th infantry regiment can be looked up online, e.g. in GenWiki or in the literature ( Das 5. Badische Infanterie-Regiment Nr. 113 im Weltkriege 1914/18 Oldenburg/Berlin 1925; Udo von Rundstedt: Das 5. Badische Infanterie-Regiment Nr. 113 im Weltkriege 1914/18 ...


6

Well, building off of Robert Shaw's answer, it appears to me that the person in the photograph is wearing a Type I unit disk, which puts the photo somewhere between 1910 and 1937. According to both the link in Robert's answer and this document - https://history.army.mil/html/museums/uniforms/survey_uwa.pdf - the regimental number (48 in this case) was ...


6

For searching in the Verlustlisten you shouldn't use Ancestry’s incomplete version, but the complete and manually indexed version by Compgen - Verein für Computergenealogie: Verlustlisten Erster Weltkrieg (German), search form (Nachname = family name, vorname = given name, Ort = (birth) place; you should fill only the first ones if possible as the original ...


6

Yes. The place however indicates the place of birth or sometimes the last residence before being drafted. The date should be the birth date.


5

Please see my answer on How to find information on German soldiers from World War I and World War II? for general research strategies. I did not find Caro Naphtali in the Verlustlisten, so – if the spelling is correct – I assume he did not die during the war and wasn’t injured or taken prisoner. There is secondary literature available for the unit, which ...


5

Unfortunately there is no single list in the UK for internees. The National Archives have a guide which covers the various items they hold, both of internees and those exempted for internment, but there is very little available in UK sources for WWI and what is available is often neither online nor easily searchable. They do also direct us to the ...


5

These are reasonable assumptions, but not concrete proof. I have not looked at the Worcestershire Regiment before but the battalion structure for WW1 is given on The Long Long Trail. There appear to be 4 Regular battalions (1st thru 4th), 2 (original) Territorial Battalions (7th and 8th) and then 2 Reserve Bns (5th & 6th). These were then supplemented ...


5

I have a similar card and from browsing cards in the same series, we can see that These numbers are not unique, several successive draft cards have the same number. The only difference seems to be the final letter: The ending letters I have observed are A, B, and C. The Massachussets Society of Genealogy gives a pretty thorough explanation: The ...


5

You don't say where your grandfather came from, so I will answer based on the assumption that he was from the UK. There is no central list of those who deserted during the war. The first place to check for a particular individual would be in their First World War service records. If your grandfather served in the British Army, then that might be a ...


5

The card would have been produced in the process of granting her a pension as a war widow, and then updated when she remarried and became ineligible to receive the pension (as she now had another husband to provide for her, relieving the state of the necessity to provide). The Western Front Association has some useful background information on these ...


5

Some of the specific techniques that can be used are to be found on the Long, Long Trail's "How To Research a Soldier". There are several points that might be raised: How many William James Truckles are there in the first place? (Bearing in mind that officialdom may omit middle names); How many were in the Forces during WW1? Of those in the Forces,...


5

Yes. Mönchengladbach was called München-Gladbach (shortened to M.-Gladbach) between 1888 and 1929, then Gladbach-Rheydt, then München Gladbach without the hyphen, then Mönchen Gladbach. Only in 1960 did they switch to their current name. ( German source, Britannica also reports the old München-Gladbach name. )


4

I outlined research options in my answer on How to find information on German soldiers from World War I and World War II? For research using the Verlustlisten you should choose the one provided by Verein für Computergenealogie (search mask, project page), as it is transcribed manually and complete (Ancestry’s version is not complete as of today). Searching ...


4

In 1917 if a Belgian living in the US wanted to fight for his country of birth then I suspect his thought process might be: How viable was it to sail to Europe and enlist for Belgium - I suspect it would cost a lot and, as @bgwiehle has commented, "civilian traffic across the Atlantic was severely curtailed by 1917, due to risk of attack (Lusitania, 1915) ...


4

There is a Russian website that has a project going to provide the data within pdf format spreadsheets. These are also in Russian and provided according to Russian province. You can find these records at http://svrt.ru/1914/1914-1.htm .


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