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My answer consists of three parts. I start with World War II because more (individual) records are available and I assume people are more interested in it. The second part focusses on World War I and possible research difficulties. The last part covers projects and institutions providing e.g. information on burial sites and memorials of both wars. World War ...


10

Any search for a UK casualty in WW1 and WW2 should always start with the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website as it should cover all such deaths. This may, of course, be the site you found! There is only one William John Miller in the Naval casualties during WW2 - the one you found. However - a word of caution - bureaucracy is never as careful as we'd ...


10

For some time, you should be able to retrieve the pages from Google's cache. Here are the steps: Run the query site:planesandpilotsofww2.totalh.com + whatever terms you think will help you find the page in question. Hover over the arrows to the right of the result to get the preview to load In the preview, click on the "cached" link Save the page offline!


10

As @TomH indirectly suggests, it is possible to request your father's Service Records from the UK's Ministry of Defence. See https://www.gov.uk/requests-for-personal-data-and-service-records, in particular the section "Service records of deceased Service personnel". Obtaining Service Records has a bad reputation because of the time it takes and the ...


9

The Internet Archive runs a service that keeps records of websites over time and can record snapshots of the Web that goes back pretty far. I've seen sites go back as far as 7 or 8 years, but they may go farther. The Wayback Machine may not really be helpful if the website was connected to a database, since it's highly unlikely that a specific URI was both ...


9

Jewish Records Indexing-Poland (JRI-Poland) is the best online resource for Jewish vital records from Poland. The site contains indexes to vital records, but not the records themselves. There are two primary sources for the data on JRI-Poland: Indexing of records that were microfilmed by the Family History Library Indexes obtained directly through a JRI-...


7

Service Number: See if you can find him in the U.S. World War II Navy Muster Rolls, 1938-1949 database at Ancestry.com. The images include the service number. Social Security Number: Assuming he doesn't show up in the Social Security Death Index (deaths prior to about the 1960s are rarely in the SSDI), here are two other options: a) Photocopy of his ...


7

It looks like the url you listed is broken but the rest of the site is still up. http://www.planesandpilotsofww2.totalh.net/panama/index.htm Hopefully what you need is still there. There is also a contact form so you may be able to make contact and find out about their primary sources and report the link which isn't working. http://planesandpilotsofww2....


7

It will be helpful to know whether the Polish towns you're looking for used to be in the former Russian Empire, or the province of Galicia in the old Austro-Hungarian Empire. As previously mentioned, JRI-Poland is your best bet if it was the former, and Gesher Galicia's All Galicia Database is your best bet for the latter. If your Polish towns are in the ...


7

The German Red Cross also maintains a WWII tracing service that works independantly from the ICRC services. They have their own records (I confirmed this via email), which indicates that they may even in some cases have information that the ICRC doesn't.


7

I understand it as follows: He arrived in Buchenwald 26 January 1945 ("26.1.45 eingel.") and was send to Sachsenhausen on 6 February 1945. This is however not verifiable just from the card. The transport might not have happened. You could send an inquiry to the memorial site of the former Buchenwald Concentration Camp for additional information. You could ...


7

I can confirm that the text on both cards is indeed in German. Your first card is dated to 1920, the second one seems to have been stamped by the post office in 1917. As far as I know Sütterlin was only developed in 1911 and taught in schools from 1915 on, so the people writing these cards would have learned another form of Kurrent rather than specifically ...


7

This article describes the incident: http://aircrewremembered.com/roy-arnold.html and leads me to search for "Oblt Walter Schneider" which comes up with another website or two. https://airpages.ru/eng/lw/fw190a1_1.shtml (Fw 190A-1, Werk Nr 027, "Yellow 1" of JG 26, of Oblt Walter Schneider in November 1941, which showed nineteen victory ...


6

Two other sites with such records are Gesher Galicia and Genealogy Indexer. Gesher Galicia especially is gaining access to records in archives in Eastern Europe that have not previously been viewed or indexed, so there is a lot of potential interest there for you.


6

I am going through this process at the moment. I am applying to the MOD for service records for my Great Uncle who was killed in action during WW2. Follow this link. You then need to download the relevant forms and send them off to the department indicated within the forms. It costs £30, but beware the records may not exist, as lots were lost during the ...


6

The International Red Cross holds a lot of information about POW's from WW2. They are currently digitising all their records. At the moment you have to make a written application for them to conduct a search and as a result the response from them can take some time. I did some research on my Father-in-law with them. It took about 3 months from when I applied ...


6

The "Berlin Airlift Historical Foundation" have a website with a fair amount of information. That includes "The Men Who Participated". That has a list of units that were involved, only some of which have crew lists linked. Fortunately, one of them is for the 12th Troop Carrier Squadron, which includes Robert S. Whitehead among its members. The 12th Troop ...


6

The Delaware Military History organization may have some useful material, including pictures and camp activity reports and newsletters. The National Archives and Record Administration (NARA) has basic records of German POW's held in the US. When the soldier was repatriated, their personnel record was given to the country for which they fought. Within that ...


6

Service records for those who served during the 20th century are held by the National Personnel Records Center, Military Personnel Records (NPRC-MPR) (part of the US National Archives in St Louis). Records are turned over to the National Archives after a certain period of time -- this is sometimes called a a rolling window. For military records, they ...


5

I assume that your father's service was with the Royal Navy during WWII. The "ships" you have named (HMS Glendower and HMS Pembroke) were in fact shore bases. HMS Glendower was a training establishment at Caernarfonshire, Wales in what had been a Butlin's holiday camp. That was probably where he did his basic recruit training. HMS Pembroke is a very ...


5

Your best place to start would be Steve Morse's Dachau record search, and see if you can find your Great Uncle. Morse's Dachau intro page gives a good overview of the extent of Dachau records available. Also see Dachau Concentration Camp Records on JewishGen which provides additional information about the records available.


5

Note: this answer pertains to the question as it was originally asked, and not necessarily to its edited form. The question was how to find any surviving relatives of Phillip Post (who came from Eltville near Frankfurt around 1860) who might have served in WWII. The usual recommendation for studying your family history is to start with yourself and to work ...


5

A search of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission grave locator for service members from WW2 who served with the Lancashire Fusiliers with a rank of Corporal yields 103 records. If your granddad is in the database, having his military service number would help you distinguish his entry from another service member with the same name. Do you have any ...


5

In the post Meaning of GO 33 WD 45 on a WWII Veteran’s Discharge on the blog Tribute to an 82nd Airborne Veteran, Jeff Clark breaks it down for us as follows: GO 33 40 is General Order 33 and General Order 40 WD 45 is War Department 1945 Putting it all together so far, it says: “General Order 33 and General Order 40 published by the War ...


5

Please see my answer on How to find information on German soldiers from World War I and World War II?. The Deutsche Dienststelle (WASt, Deutsche Dienststelle für die Benachrichtigung der nächsten Angehörigen von Gefallenen der ehemaligen deutschen Wehrmacht) has also the records for members of the Luftwaffe. Additional information on officers might also be ...


5

From Ancestry.com I can see that your great grandfather certainly registered for the draft during World War 2: These details: Name: Robert Seaborne Whitehead Age: 50 Birth Date: 22 Jun 1892 Residence Year: 1942 Residence: Ft Worth, Texas, USA are from: The National Archives at St. Louis; St. Louis, Missouri; Draft Registration Cards for Fourth ...


5

If I am correct the Charles Fredrick Evans as required by you is listed as a Gunner in the Royal Artillery. His service number was 1801591 and you could follow him up on line via Forces war records, if required for a fee. He is also listed under find a grave index, death 28 Feb 1945 and Listed with his mother Emma Elizabeth Evans, aged 42, when he was aged 7,...


5

The German War Graves Commission (Volksbund) is the authority that maintains a database of German war graves (especially World War I and World War II). The only mandatory information you need for a search is the surname. (I would always start with a broad search and limit it down by given name or year of death later. Don’t search by date of birth or ...


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