3

My 3rd great grandfather Robert Sillars/Sellars/Sellers was baptised on 15 Oct 1830 at Dundonald, Ayr, Scotland and spent much of his adult life from about 1854 to about 1870 (when he died is unknown) in North and South America.

There is an intriguing record at FindMyPast for a Robert Sillers listed in the Index to Register of Passport Applications 1851-1903 that has an image showing one dated 2 Oct 1861 with number 49990.

The image has "Crown Copyright Images reproduced by courtesy of The National Archives, London, England" along the bottom so I assume the index is held there, but are the Passport Applications themselves still held anywhere so that I might be able to find some more details about this one?

2
  • the robert sillers, i believe you are referring to, is like my 5th cousin ive been doing alot of research on the sillers history, if you have any questions about the sillers, you can contact me using email or facebook
    – user4709
    Feb 12 '16 at 17:51
  • @user4709 If you are confident that you are a descendant of the Robert Sillars/Sellars/Sellers who was baptised on 15 Oct 1830 at Dundonald, Ayr, Scotland then I will be happy to hear from you via the contact details in my user card. In your user card is the only place that your contact details should be posted here, and so I have deleted them from your comment. As a new user to G&FH SE, welcome! Please take the tour to learn about the ways this site differs from bulletin boards, discussion forums and other Q&A sites.
    – PolyGeo
    Feb 12 '16 at 21:47
3

The National Archives has a guide: How to look for records of Passports.

The index record you have found on FindMyPast is in FO 611/10.

The registers of passport applications are held in series FO 610. They are organized by passport number, and no 49990 would be found in FO 610/29 (Entry Book of Passports issued. Nos.45881-50072). This record series may not contain a lot more information than the index. These records are also not available online.

As far as I can see, the passport applications themselves have not routinely survived. However, it is always worth doing a thorough search of The National Archives catalogue and National Records of Scotland catalogue to see if you can locate any relevant records.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.