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5

You've made a good start by testing at all three companies and uploading your results to GEDMatch -- as Judy G. Russell says in her recent post DNA testing for adoptees, "fish in all the ponds". The answer to "which test to take next" -- it depends. What do you want to know first? Before you buy any product like this, it helps to know what information ...


5

Yes, you can search the 1940 census for residence in 1935. Searching only for those who were in different places in 1935 and 1940 is not directly possible (unless you know the 1940 location), although scanning the search results will identify any 1940 residences that don't match the 1935 value. At ancestry.com go to 1940 United States Federal Census use ...


5

In many states, yes, original birth certificates (OBCs) are sealed when a child is adopted. An amended birth certificate is then issued with the adoptive parents' names and the child's new name. So, no, adoptees do not go through life without a birth certificate. You're somewhat in luck; Illinois, according to the American Adoption Congress partially opened ...


5

Okay, so there's good news and there's bad news. The bad news first: At the moment (February 2019) all New York State adoptees' Original Birth Certificates (OBC's), and usually their adoption paperwork as well, are sealed. Totally sealed. Doesn't matter if the adoptees are dead, doesn't matter if they're alive and they already know all the info on the ...


5

No. The legal process for adoption the UK wasn't introduced until 1926/27. Before that adoptions were informal agreements and did not need to be legally registered. https://www.jstor.org/stable/30009455?seq=1 will give you some background information. The answer at https://genealogy.stackexchange.com/a/2801/6485 may also give you some ideas of how to ...


4

Using your five known maternal matches to separate out most of your maternal matches from your paternal matches is definitely the correct track. However, further eliminating those that match with your paternal half-brother does not reduce your remaining matches to those who match your paternal grandmother. Your remaining matches are potentially both ...


4

The legal process for adoption wasn't introduced in England & Wales until 1926/7. The relationship on the census shows exactly what the situation was - that they were children of his wife, not his, and weren't using (or known by) his surname. There is no suggestion from that that any form of adoption took place.


4

I don't think the word "sham" applies, and no, it was not a common or widespread practice. Your example has the second and third cases of adult adoption that I have encountered in ten years of Hungarian genealogy research. Based on what I can find online, such adoption contracts were usually between a childless older adult and a younger adult, and they were ...


3

Unfortunately it's not possible to determine which side of the family all your DNA matches are without phasing. In order to phase your matches completely, you need to have either your mother or father, or another close relative, also test – which it sounds like is not possible in your case. The problem why you cannot identify a certain match as maternal or ...


3

As far as I'm aware, it was a criminal offence to falsify a birth certificate in New York in 1927. That is not to say that people didn't do it, as evidenced by the case of the notorious child-trafficker Georgia Tann. Interestingly, the bill that sealed adoption records in NY state was signed by acting NY Governor Lehman, who had adopted his children from ...


3

There was no formal system of adoption in England in the eighteenth century. In fact, it was not until the Adoption of Infants Act of 1926 that there was any centralised register for adoptions. Prior to this date, most adoptions were informal arrangements. In your case, there were two likely outcomes. If there was family money to raise the children, there ...


3

For Document 2, you say: The second ... is from: Orphans Court Proceedings, 1752-1857; Index; Author: Pennsylvania. Orphans' Court (Berks County); Probate Place: Berks, Pennsylvania and Document 2 From 1821 referencing page 483. Michael listed as "Children Guardian" Catherine and Joseph as "Guardian Appointed". The index appears to say Volume 7 ...


3

Go to http://DNAadoption.com and look at their methodology: This is the repository for documentation about using your DNA results. While the site was originally conceived of for adoptees, it is proving to be useful for genealogy as well. Our goal is to help you find the answers you are looking for through the use of DNA testing and more ...


3

As you already know, in New York State, divorce records can be tricky to obtain. Dick Hillenbrand at the "Upstate New York Genealogy Blog", published this post in 2008. Although time has passed, NY hasn't done much, if anything, to loosen up vital records access, so it probably still applies: http://www.unyg.com/blog/index.php/2008/02/are-divorces-sealed-in-...


3

1912 cM is an excellent match; this woman is definitely a close relative. Let's take a look at the Shared cM Project numbers: Grandparent fits the cM range but obviously it's impossible, given your ages. Half sibling fits well (range 1317-2312). Aunt/niece fits well (range 1349-2175). Great aunt also fits (range 251-2108) but we'll rule it out due to age. ...


3

It is a birth registration. redacted are (in order): [registration number unredacted] [registration place unrededacted, Himmelsthür is now part of Hildesheim, Niedersachsen] registration date [year unredacted] mother's name [probably also her age, marital status and occupation, possibly birthplace and parents' names if reported] mother's address [husband's ...


3

There is no such thing as a cut-off, just a range of probabilities. The Shared CM project tool shows that half-sibling is one possibility with that amount of shared DNA, but there are others that are equally possible. If you've done a lot of research on the family, the WATO tool can help you model the possibilities and assess which is most probable.


2

There are two program which realize features you requested. They are GRAMPS (it was mentioned in a previous answer) to What software can reliably store and manage non-linear (eg non-blood or remarried) relatives? and GenoPro. A small word regarding GenoPro. It is very powerful program with evaulation period (so you can test it before buy) with the extensive ...


2

It looks like Ancestry has done a semi-indexed pass-through of FamilySearch's Pennsylvania Probate Records. If you go to FamilySearch directly, their microfilm set includes not only the Orphan's Court Proceedings for Berks County, Pa., but also the Orphan's Court Dockets, the wills & administration files, and the estate files themselves (although the ...


2

Ancestry.com and Familysearch.org will let you search census indexes using multiple family members' names, but I don't know of any sites that allow search by multiple family members' ages. However, this Familysearch.org WILDCARD Search may shorten the list of families you need to eyeball. Put in the Last Name: * a * (asterisk A asterisk, with no spaces) ...


2

I would start by looking at the 1920 Fayette Co., OH census: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9RXB-7TD?mode=g&i=6&wc=QZJR-16M%3A1036474301%2C1037452601%2C1038441001%2C1589332401%3Fcc%3D1488411&cc=1488411 Ethel is not listed, but her mother Betty is, and living with Betty is a "step-daughter" named Nancy Ferguson, the same age as ...


2

No, this is a 1st cousin, not a half-sibling. According to the Shared cM Project, half-siblings average 1783 cM, with 99% in the range 1317 - 2312 cM. First cousins average 874 cM, with 99% in the range 553 - 1225 cM. Note that there's no overlap between these 99th percentile ranges, so a given sample is either one or the other. The good news for you is ...


2

Start with whatever is easiest for you to find, take lots of notes, and build a case. If you have a family tree program on your computer, use that. I recommend recording every single fact you have, even ones you think are wrong. Create sources for every place you got information. I even have sources that I call "Family Lore" (with subsets for surnames/...


2

If you know for certain that this is your birth mother, then the results are incorrect. DNA companies have been known to make mistakes, the data might not have got loaded correctly, etc. I'd recommend you contact the DNA company(ies) involved and get them to recheck your sample and to ensure everything has been processed correctly.


2

Entering your shared 1549 Centimorgans into the Shared cM Project tool at DNA Painter suggests a number of possible relationships. None of them indicate that this lady is your birthmother, but she is certainly at least a close relative. One possibility may be that you are actually her granddaughter. That possibility would rely on her being old enough to ...


2

A single person's DNA alone (yours) cannot tell you who you're related to (other than in a vague, very distant, ethnic sense, maybe). If you have close enough matches with people who know a good deal about their extended family and ancestry, it might be possible to combine that with other knowledge to get closer to an answer. If your second-cousin matches ...


2

The conclusion in this statement isn't quite right: On Ancestry there are 5 matches I know to be maternal cousins. I used them to eliminate shared matches leaving what should be paternal matches. When you remove your matches with a maternal cousin, you are only removing some of the maternal relation matches you have. The set of remaining matches are a ...


2

Yes, you're on the right track and doing a great job so far. The only thing I see wrong in your logic is that people who don't match your half-brother should be on your mother's side, not your paternal grandmother's side. Your half brother is still fully related to both paternal grandparents. What you have been doing so far is akin to what's called ...


2

I started by eliminating the GWP branch of the tree and finding the best fit to the JHP branch. This is shown here. One hypothesis is 4 generations removed from PJPEH and has a score of 4,923,736,333. You can then keep the GWP branch and eliminate the JHP branch to get this. The best hypothesis there has a score of 11 and is 3 generations removed from PJPEH. ...


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