8

I agree with the comments that it more likely reads "C. E. Markby". A good possibility would be the Rev. Cecil Edward Campbell Markby. He was recorded as "Clerk of Holy Orders" in Dorchester, Dorset on the 1939 Register, a short way from Salisbury (see RG 101/6918C, no 187): Local newspapers seem to confirm this is the right man. For ...


6

At that time, a suicide would not have been buried in consecrated ground. Suicide was both a sin and a criminal offence. Burial in consecrated ground was only permitted after 1823 without ritual, and with ritual only after the 1880 Burial Act, one description of which is found here. As the Church would have nothing to do with the burial of a suicide, ...


5

Shipping the body back to the home village is a possibility, as you can see in the related question What records might be created in England when people are re-interred?. In his book talk The Forgotten Irish: Irish Emigrant Experiences in America, author Damian Shiels talked about Civil War Veterans being shipped home to Ireland from the United States. (...


5

"Would a vicar enter a burial if no burial took place?" Possibly. I have seen (and started) more than one thread about exactly what the meaning of an entry in a burial register is. The "obvious" answer is - it means a burial, so a funeral with burial elsewhere would not be entered. However, it was clear that examples do exist of funerals at that church ...


5

The German War Graves Commission (Volksbund) is the authority that maintains a database of German war graves (especially World War I and World War II). The only mandatory information you need for a search is the surname. (I would always start with a broad search and limit it down by given name or year of death later. Don’t search by date of birth or ...


5

The entries begin "Item uppon the...". Item is a Latin word meaning "also", commonly found in British parish registers and documents such as inventories where entries are written in list. On its etymology, Wiktionary states: The word started as Latin item for "also", "in the same manner", and got its present English meaning from a misunderstanding of ...


4

This does read like a gravestone epitaph, especially the line from the hymn "Come unto Me and rest". There are a few resources for the Isle of Wight that would be my first ports of call. The Isle of Wight FHS website contains two databases that are potentially useful in your case: Monumental Inscriptions Index: The coverage page says that inscriptions for ...


4

I do research on Albany Rural Cemetery burials on a very frequent basis. The phrase "In whose lot interred" on the Albany Rural Cemetery burial index cards always refers to the person whose name is recorded on the lot deed (as in whomever purchased the lot). The party would not have to be living to be listed as the owner of the lot. The ownership of the ...


4

From the information provided it sounds like she likely died in Iowa in the 1930s; this falls within the state of Iowa's currently available public death certificate request timeframe. As of February 2016 this is up through 1938. I would recommend requesting a copy of her Death Certificate from the Iowa History website or the applicable county records. The ...


4

Cemetery listings There are 2 Mount Washington Cemeteries in Missouri - one in Independence, Jackson County and a smaller one in Plattsburg, Clinton County. Most likely the Mount Washington in Independence was meant, since a city was not specified. Anna Foster also not found in billiongraves.com & interment.net. Goodman and Boller Funeral Home I ...


4

Whether in English or in Russian, almost all Jewish gravestones for males also give the Hebrew name of the person followed by the Hebrew word "ben" meaning "son of" followed by the Hebrew name of their father. This may have a suffix of "hacohen" or "halevi" in Hebrew if they are from the male line of the Priests or the Levites. You say in your comment that ...


4

I believe L. H. M. stood for Light Horse Man. This was a rank of light-armed soldier. There are numerous references to this rank in Chelsea Hospital and its Traditions (1838). Just for your interest – a light horseman of that era would have looked something like this 1791 sketch (source British Museum): I would encourage you to browse through other pages ...


4

My general advice on finding records in a particular area is in this answer: What records are available in a particular locale? My checklist looks like this: Learn what records might have been created in a particular time and place. Research which of those records might still exist, and which records are accessible to the public (not subject to ...


3

After getting links from @ColeValleyGirl I viewed a burial record for Catherine Rouse, aged 84, on 4 Jan 1857 at Truro St Mary: transcription: https://www.findmypast.co.uk/transcript?id=R_273488574 (needs site subscription) image: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-6SK9-HZN?i=151 (needs site registration) This is the best candidate burial ...


3

I can't see an obvious burial record for Edward, but if you can find out where his wife was buried, there's a decent chance he'll be there too. Or he could be in a family plot somewhere, so you could look for his father and mother too. Edward's probate record on Ancestry says "of Sileby near Loughborough" which matches the 1901 census. The residence ...


3

You might try searching for the record on Cook County Genealogy. Once you register, you can search for death records that are over 20 years old. To view the actual record, however, you need to pay $17. Generally place of burial is indicated on the death certificate.


3

If you haven't already done so, I suggest placing an inquiry with the local genealogy group in Chicago. I was looking for information on my grandmother who was never issued a death certificate (she died around 1905), and the local genealogy group in that particular county was quite helpful. As they are usually volunteers, it may take a little while to get ...


3

A couple of suggestions for you in the local area that may narrow down your search: Gloucestershire county archives are largely kept at the archive office in Gloucester. Almondsbury nowadays is pretty much just a suburb of Bristol, which has its own archives. These include local cremation records, which may help if your Granddad was cremated in a Bristol ...


3

Looks like Carvoda, an isolated farm/hamlet, south of Launceston and then south east of the village of Lezant. It's quite close to the A388 Launceston-Callington-Saltash road but road access is only via B roads west of the main road.


3

Carvoda Carvoda is/was a farm and settlement very close to Lezant (as shown on this modern map). It is spelled Curvoda on an earlier map (1883 Ordinance Survey). An Index to the Historical Place Names of Cornwall, vol 1 has this entry: Curvoda - Lezant, farm (Symons, 1884); Crevoada, 1806; Crevoada, Curvoda, 1884. As a matter of interest, according ...


3

For a different London cemetery in a slightly later period I found: Brought From - The place of death; could be hospital, hospice or home address. My first thought was that Hoxton Square might be where he had been residing so I checked Land Tax Records on Ancestry.com. I found that John Smyth was living in Holywell Street (now called Shoreditch ...


3

Depending on the location, there might exist municipal or, more likely, church records of the location's residents. I would suggest trying to contact local municipal and/or church authorities, which might have these records in possession. Another route is to find a local person who could find/retrieve/request this information for you. Also, as far as I know, ...


3

The phrase following the placename is: eine Stadt am Ägäisches Meer that is, "a city on the Aegean Sea" That means that "Veles" must be in either Greece or Turkey Fuzzy Gazetteer suggests a number of possibles for Greece. Vélos and Vólos are on the coast. Turkey doesn't have any good matches on the coast No likely places are marked on the Volksbund "...


3

If you go to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission site (which should be your starting point for any Commonwealth military burial), it will tell you that he is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, along with 20957 other soldiers. There is no burial register or grave. There is also a memorial inscription for him at Woodford in Wiltshire. See War Memorials ...


2

When searching for a person's burial (in whatever place or country), there are often a couple of "routes" you may have to try out to find this information. A good place to start (as you have already done) is looking for a gravestone on various sites like Find-A-Grave. Also take a look at more local websites like the Iowa Gravestone Photo Project and ...


2

I agree that there can be little doubt that "In Whose Lot Interred" refers to the proprietor of the lot. A search on the Albany Rural Cemetery website, entering only the section number 103 as my search parameter, made it possible to locate the other people buried in the same plot. In section 103, lot 32 are buried: Harriet Forster, d. 29 Nov 1874 Caroline ...


2

For those who haven't yet visited the website of the Albany Rural Cemetery -- the site has other resources besides the search box that allows you to directly search for people who might be interred there. Of particular instance in this case: Churchill's 1858 Guidebook which has in its front matter a section of rules and regulations about what can be done ...


2

The Index To Death Duty Registers 1796-1903 at FindMyPast gives the residence of Edward Brewer Brooks at the time of his death on 11 May 1901 as being Loughborough. You may already know this but, if not, it may provide you with another search term.


2

On the limited information provided the following would appear to be a candidate burial for Hannah Evans on 12 Jan 1824 at Leominster. "England Deaths and Burials, 1538-1991," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J874-161 : 24 December 2014), Hannah Evans, 12 Jan 1824; citing , reference item 2 p 119; FHL microfilm 1,593,...


2

In 1667 and 1678 the English wool trade was in trouble so a law was passed requiring every body would be wrapped in a woollen shroud to help the industry. Remember that everyday folk would not have wooden coffins. An affidavit had to be sworn at each burial that this had been complied with or a fine was payable. Any date given would be the date of burial. ...


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