15

Vilna is an old Russian name for Vilnius, the capital of Lithuania. It was also the name of Vilna Governate, a Russian territory that from 1795 to 1915 covered the south-east of modern Lithuania (and beyond into Belarus). So maybe we can start by assuming that Eiszuk was in the part of Russia that now Lithuania (this is just an assumption, it would be nice ...


9

I am not an expert on Macedonian place names or history but from Macedonian Village Names THE NAMES OF 804 MACEDONIAN VILLAGES IN AEGEAN MACEDONIA, occupied by Greece in 1912, that have forcedly been changed from 1926 and forward. Submitted by Lena Jankovski and Alex Bakratcheff I wonder whether it may be: MACEDONIAN NAME (District) Greek ...


8

Passenger lists can be difficult to decipher, and I think the transcriber has interpreted the place name incorrectly. I think a more accurate transcription would be: Berditschew. Translating place names from Russian to English can be more of an art than a science, and this is likely a spelling of Berdychiv in modern Ukraine. The JewishGen Gazetteer gives ...


8

You may also check Szumki (pronounced /shoomki/), Bielsk county, Poland. The entire Bielsk county was occupied by Russia between 1807 and 1915. There's a weak point in this version, I can't figure out what "As" may mean here. It can be a distorted "osada" ("settlement") or something else.


8

Avvakum (Lat.: Abacuc, Ukr.: Аввакум, Grk.: Αμβακουμ) is a biblical name derived from the name of prophet Habakuk (ca. 612 BC). Also a notable person, protopope Avvakum Petrov (1620-1682) who led the opposition to Patriarch Nikon's reforms of the Russian Orthodox Church. Therefore, this name was popular among Old Believers (Ukr.: ...


7

I have family roots I'm searching in Berdichev in the Ukraine, south of Zhytomyr. I wasn't familiar with the Berdychiv spelling given by Harry, but that does appear to be the same city. I've often heard this branch of my family refer to one of themselves as a Berdichever. It could very well have been that your grandparent said it that way when they were ...


7

That appears to be the index card for the naturalisation petition in New Haven Connecticut. The birthplace may well be mis-transcribed by the indexer. I think you can check the original naturalisation documents on FindMyPast or Ancestry (I haven't used these particular collections before, so I'm uncertain about the exact nature of the contents). I don't ...


7

If you consult the enumerators schedule associated with this piece, you will find a description of the area covered. In this case, the piece includes (I may have made transcription errors): All that part of the Parish of Saint Mary on the Hill extending from the Hare & Hounds Public House to the West End of the Bottoms Lane comprising all the ...


6

I checked my favorite town database for any appropriate towns in Eastern Europe starting with "Yob…" or "Job…" and came up blank. I also searched for any towns that ended in "…neks" or "…necks" and also had no hits. I think you should assume that the town was being written down phonetically on the draft card by an American who was dealing with an immigrant ...


6

Topographic Maps of Eastern Europe is a great site. If you are looking for a place in Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Eastern Poland and Western Belarus, the topographic maps published by the Prussian military at the turn of the 20th century are really good. The map is divided into grids an you can click on them to drill down to see the map detail.


6

The problem with using "current" names as the only name, is that "current" changes over time. Is the Crimea part of the Ukraine or of Russia. If you attempt to use "current" you're dooming yourself to a never ending job of updating locations. I prefer an approach, supported by the tool I use, Genbox, that uses the name at the time of the event which links ...


6

Technique Generally when you cannot find information on very small or insignificant placenames, you research nearby larger places (because events may apply to a larger area) or the next placename in the hierarchy. You may even get lucky and find passing references to your main interest that weren't directly searchable. Scope Angloh (var. Angerloh) is ...


6

"Ostroweic" doesn't seem like a plausible name in Polish language, very likely it is "Ostrówiec" or "Ostrowice". There is dozens of villages all over Poland with that name, including one relatively large town in Belarus which was Polish before the second world war. There is also a surprisingly large pound of small villages called Ostrów, in both Poland and ...


6

Not sure about the town, but the locality is "pow. Kamień Koszyrski" - powiat Kamień Koszyrski. Here's the list of "powiaty" (counties) in 2nd Polish Republic (1918-1939) : https://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Podzia%C5%82_administracyjny_II_Rzeczypospolitej#Wojew%C3%B3dztwo_poleskie Current name of the county town is (English spelling) Kamin'-Kashyrs'kyi (Ukr. ...


6

Sometimes you can get lucky by searching for town lists. Searching for a town list for Bessarabia leads to a Jewish Genealogy site, which has a town list alphabetized. The name you list isn't there, exactly. But a town whose name seems to close to be a coincidence is listed, and that is Sekareny. The web site also lists some other names which the town has ...


5

Probably that can be an urban-type settlement in Russian Empire Zhytomyr district. (now in Zhytomyr oblast of Ukraine) called Pulyny or Pulin. Now In 1935 name of the settlement was changed to Chervonoarmejsk. Till 1793 it had belong to Poland. Probably, he is originated from a german settlement in that area.


5

No, I can find no evidence that Libege is a real place. I think it is simply a spelling error for Liège on that family tree that has been perpetuated on several other family tree websites. However you can be fairly certain that the author meant Liège by taking a quick look at the Wikipedia page for the same person.


5

The answer could be Jatołtowicze. From Google maps it looks to be a very small village.


5

To answer this question, indeed, more information is needed: *Hus- is a very common root for toponyms. It literally means goose, so every village located near a lake or a slow-motion river where plenty of geese resided, might be called in this manner. So let me focus on the last part of your question, …or can tell me where to look to find it? Let me ...


5

I guess the answer to this depends on the location (country), but you gave Norway as an example here. In Norway there is actually a register dedicated to the spelling of location names: "Sentralt Stedsnavnregister" ("Centralized Placename Register"). This register is maintained by The Norwegian Mapping Authority and contains 950 000 placenames with a total ...


5

I think it may be the town of Yelisavetgrad (also spelled Yelisavetgrod), now the city of Kropyvnytskyi in central Ukraine. If you are able to read Polish, the entry for Elizabetgrod in the Glossary of the Kingdom of Poland and other Slavic countries may provide some useful background. (Pages are shown as TIFF images, but with an OCR program, a little (or, ...


5

To locate a shtetl (a small town or village where there was a Jewish community), the free, nonprofit Jewish genealogy web site JewishGen has several useful tools. First, as has been recommended on similar questions, the JewishGen Communities Database and JewishGen Gazetteer (https://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/) allow you to search among approximately 6,...


5

GENUKI's gazetteer entry for Kenwyn says: The parish of Kenwyn, (Cornish: Keynwynn), is situated in the Deanery and Hundred of Powder. It is bounded on the north by St Allen, on the east by St Clements, the parish of St Marys Truro and the river Fal, on the south by Kea, and on the west by St Agnes, the detached part of Kea called Tregavethen, and ...


5

The best match that I could find is 'Shemetitsa' from the JewishGen Gazetteer. It is listed as a 'populated place' with coordinates 51° 03'N 28° 26'E, which would place it within the Volhynian governorate in the north of modern Ukraine, about 2km SE of Luhyny. I've looked for it with a number of online maps, including mapcarta, and Google Maps and there ...


5

There are several villages called Kurgan'e (Курганье) in present-day Russia and Belarus. Yandex Maps has a settlement called Kurgan'e, a part of Vladimirovka village, in Klichev district, Mogilev oblast of Belarus, and a bus stop called Novoe Kurgan'e nearby. Wikimapia names that settlement Novoe Kurgan'e, and the description of Wikimapia object says that ...


5

You need to consult a historical gazetteer of Poland that takes into account the boundary changes with other countries over the years. https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/Poland_Gazetteers is a good starting point to identify a suitable gazetteer. Your document is from 1945 , so you're looking for a relatively recent gazetteer. I haven't checked in any of ...


5

It does seem that the province shown in your document for both the birthplace and the desired destination is "Śląsk". That is the polish word for the Silesia region of Poland which existed between 1742 and 1945. It is located in what now is southern Poland bordering with Germany and the Czech Republic. The town is likely Chorzów, which is not ...


4

(Yes I know it is an old question...) It can be helpful to understand how spelling has changed over time, to know what to search for. In the example from Norway we have Spilleren in Meløy. Meløy has the modern spelling of the word island, "øy". In the old Danish spelling used in Norway during the union (up to 1814, and beyond) it would be Melø. (As in the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible