We changed our privacy policy. Read more.
14

The cause of death was: Haemorrhage from Duodenal ulcer


12

1a Left Ventricular Failure (b) Myocardial Degeneration (c) Arterio sclerosis Certified by C. J. C. Leggins MRCS In other words, left-sided heart failure.


10

First I feel obligated to say that there is no such thing as a UK death certificate. There are death certificates for England & Wales, then there are death certificates from Scotland, and there are death certificates from Northern Ireland. Three sets of rules and regulations that cannot be amalgamated into one. You seem to be referring to the new GRO ...


10

My reading is "profesión, sus labores". In view of the 1970 film "De profesión, sus labores" I take it this is how one says "housewife/domestic duties" on a Spanish Death certificate. See also the translation from an online dictionary: profesión: sus labores (en censo, formulario) occupation: housewife


9

An article at ohiohistory.org seems to have some clues as to where to look, and has some general information on the requirements in Ohio at that time. It appears your relative may have died during a transition period for death records in the state of Ohio. In July 1867, it became a statewide law to record deaths at the probate court of the county where ...


9

'In attendance' means someone who was tending to the deceased during their final illness, but was not present when they died (hat tip to Harry Vervet at https://genealogy.stackexchange.com/a/15587/6485). She died (recorded) at 14 Heavitree Road -- you can't infer anything from this single piece of data, other than where she died. Her usual address (based ...


8

Your question "Why did my uncle's death certificate not appear in the Family History Library's archives?" contains several hidden assumptions. I'm going to make these explicit, not because I want to make an example of you, but because we ALL make these mistakes, and I hope this answer will be helpful to everyone. But the short answer to your question is ...


8

Gut reaction from most English family historians will be - the chances are that the records are gone. (Situation in Scotland may be different, as it's a different legal system). According to Mark Herber's "Ancestral Trails", "Many coroners' records have been lost or destroyed. Any records surviving from before 1875 are now preserved [my emphasis, AB] but a ...


8

Over the past few years, there have been efforts to restrict ALL access to the SSDI. Some background to explain why RootsWeb's search form was taken down, and why other websites now have redacted information, follows at the end of this answer. Steve Morse’s One-Step Web pages has a form for Searching the Social Security Death Index (SSDI) in One Step. His ...


8

Paralysis. Determining the underlying cause is pure speculation, but suffice it to say that the person had some sort of neurologic disorder. Causes could range from trauma to infectious or inflammatory disease, and everything in between. A useful source to identify causes of death on old death certificates is Antiquus Morbus. For paralysis, it states: Palsy....


8

"In attendance" does not necessarily mean that they witnessed the death. For deaths that occurred at home, the informant was usually either by someone "present at the death" or someone "in attendance". The latter means someone who was tending to the deceased during their final illness, but was not present when they died. The relevant legislation (Births ...


7

I have several instances of this in my tree. In each case I record both. The place of death being the hospital, or other location, where the death occurred. Also record the last place where the person lived as part of their residence history. I have a couple of cases where someone lived in a care home for some years, then I record that as their last ...


7

There is no such thing as a UK death certificate This question highlights a common misconception that the UK is more or less equivalent to England, but for genealogical purposes it is important to recognize the distinction. In 1908, the UK was the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, thus comprised of 4 countries: England, Wales, Scotland, and ...


7

Georgia registration of deaths statewide began in 1919 and was generally complied with by 1922. But there may be records at the local level. Unfortunately, marriage records in Georgia didn't record the parents of the bride and groom, so you won't be able to find direct evidence of his father's name there. You may have to build a case using indirect ...


7

I don't think this is a comprehensive answer, but I will outline my process for dealing with record hints on services which offer them like Ancestry and Find My Past. Assemble all the information you already know (as you've done in writing the question). Make a timeline and work from the 'last seen' date forward in small increments, or work outward from ...


7

The death certificate itself, surely. I am assuming that what you have seen is only an index to the death certificates, as I have never seen death certificates without cause of death. We can't be more specific without knowing which administration issued the certificate. The link below is to an index to the General Registrar Office certificates for England ...


7

There are several places one might find information about a cause of death for a person who died in England and Wales in the 1950s: Death certificate: As per Adrian's answer, the death certificate is the obvious place to find the answer. The cheapest way to obtain a certificated copy of an entry of death from England and Wales is from the GRO. The statutory ...


7

Death certificates in England and Wales did not include information about the parents of the deceased: The situation in Scotland is different, and information about the parents of the deceased is included (provided that it was known to the informant).


7

I agree that it reads Chronic Rheumatism. While the rheumatism itself was unlikely to have been the actual cause of death, it could have been any one of several other common co-morbidities of rheumatism which may or may not have been clinically apparent at that time. Rheumatism can lead to disease in everything from the cardiovascular system to ...


7

The report you want is available on Histpop.org. Specifically, go to page 286 of the report titled: Areas, families or separate occupiers, and population, England and Wales, Vol. II. Registration areas, 1911. This shows the sub-districts (in the order they were enumerated) in Wakefield Registration District at the time of the 1911 census: Bretton Sandal ...


7

The numbering a,b,c indicates the way the conditions relate to the death, and should always be read "backwards". So - Arterial sclerosis caused Myocardial degeneration, which in turn led to left ventricular failure, which was the actual cause of death.


7

First, investigate the birth registrations (using the GRO website -- free but you do have to register) for Margaret Amy Williams and Margaret Ann Williams in the June and September quarters in 1899 (both quarters because she was born so close to the June quarter end) and compare the maiden names of the mother with the maiden names of Frederick Williams to ...


7

The cause of death is 'senectus', or put more simply, just 'old age'. The grand-daughter's surname appears to be 'Brumley' (most of the letter-forms appear to match other examples in that sample)


6

The Social Security Administration's The History of the Social Security Number gives a timeline for the creation of the SSA and shows how the use of the Social Security number (SSN) as an ID number has expanded over time. It is useful to search more than one online source for the Social Security Death Index because not all sites report exactly the same ...


6

Common names are always difficult because there are so many false positives. With such a common name as Thomas Jones, I would not search public death records or look for the death certificate until I had the precise place and date of death or burial. To attempt to pin Mr. Jones down, I would search in two areas: First I'd try searching the obituary ...


6

If you are only looking for the date, you can search online the City of Paris civil registry reconstituted books. Select Acte de décès (Death record) for Type d'acte, enter the last name of your ancestor in the Nom de la personne recherchée field and press Rechercher (Search). That should bring a page with a list of death records tables for people with ...


6

Ancestry.com has a marriage record ($) for Alois Bauch (marriage to Selma Günther on 28 March 1905). A side note lists only one son, born 1907 (number 160/1907 Wilmersdorf), who married in 1940 in Wilhelmshaven (number 455?/1940). If city directories don’t list the family later than 1922, it is possible that Alois Bauch either died (and his wife is listed ...


6

As @sempaiscuba's answer states, parentage information was not normally included on death certificates in England and Wales. There are, though, at least a couple of situations where one or both parents might be identified. The GRO has some handy little guides to the information shown on standard Birth, Marriage and Death certificates here. The guide to ...


6

With the help of the links that were shared and Google Translate, I was able to translate the record as follows: Death Notice in Danish: Forhenværende husejer af Vennebjerg, Vennebjerg, sogn. Fodt i Haage, Vennebjerg sogn d 26 Marts 1859. Hjemme døbt d 13 April 1859. Fremstillet I Vennebjerg kirke d 31 Juli 1859. Son of this mand Soren Mouritsen og husten ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible