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12

Tentatively, those names do look rather Spanish, but that need not mean much. However, Wikipedia's page on Spanish naming conventions notes that: Currently in Spain, people bear a single or composite given name (nombre) and two surnames (apellidos). ... Traditionally, a person's first surname is the father's first surname (apellido paterno), and the ...


10

My reading is "profesión, sus labores". In view of the 1970 film "De profesión, sus labores" I take it this is how one says "housewife/domestic duties" on a Spanish Death certificate. See also the translation from an online dictionary: profesión: sus labores (en censo, formulario) occupation: housewife


8

I have great news for you. :) A 24 years old single man called Pedro Penalba Agueda arrived in Buenos Aires on 1930/03/18. The ship was "Conte Rosso". You can run the search here: https://cemla.com/buscador/ Note that the last name appears as "Penalba", not Ñ but N. This could be an error when he arrived, or an electronic misspelling when loading the ...


7

"i" means "and". They both were Catalan. Nowadays in Catalunya we still use both family names but only a few still use the conjunction "i" between them. Becouse of globalization it starts to be common to use only our first name. But our ID card has the two names. http://ca.wikipedia.org/wiki/Onom%C3%A0stica_jueva is a link to the wiki talking about the ...


6

I think it reads Enguids Note that the last letter (an S) is a superior letter. I think it is an abbreviation of the name of the town. So it could be Enguídanos, a town about 23km from Graja de Iniesta.


6

I'm no great shakes at Spanish but fortunately many medical terms derive from the same Latin and Greek roots: coma urémico, esclerosis generalizada Translates to: Uraemic coma, generalized sclerosis Presumably kidney failure, it is unclear whether the sclerosis was a primary or secondary problem.


6

Other answers have already confirmed that those are clearly Catalan surnames, although they are not very common - in fact, surnames of Catalan origin are very diverse, so they tend to be rare. I can confirm that "i" is just the conjunction "and" that is placed between paternal (first) and maternal (second) surnames in formal contexts. Here is some ...


5

In the pre-computer days, we used to have school handouts made on ditto machines or spirit duplicators that printed in purple ink. Once photocopiers became more common, we sometimes needed to make photocopies of these pale materials. One trick was to insert the sheet with the purple printing into a translucent yellow report cover, so that the ink appeared ...


5

First of all: the genetic makeup part of a DNA test result is fun, but isn't something that can be relied upon or ever provide 'proof', because it's based on the DNA reference groups and samples held by the company that made it. It's very much broad brush strokes. For tracing ancestors, the valuable evidence is obviously the DNA itself. It's very unlikely,...


5

This page of the Paterna city council shows different maps of the city, including orthoimages of the flight made by the Army Map Service of the United States in 1956 (under Cartografía --> Histórico --> Americano 1956): Geoportal Paterna You can also check the Centro Nacional de Información Geográfica web page. You can find old maps going to ...


4

I think it reads: natural de la Trajo de Imeita [wrong] natural de la Graja de Iniesta término municipal de id [idéntico] provincia de Quenca (thanks @Javi García and @Trebia Project for clarifying) but since that is not what was asked for I think the other location referenced does not start with a G because there are enough captial Gs that look different. ...


4

According to https://www.mjusticia.gob.es/BUSCADIR/ServletControlador the correct office is Tudela. So they would forward if needed to Corella City Hall:


4

Pamplona is in the region of Navarra and so you will need to search for records from this region. Family Search has quite a lot from this time period and is regularly adding more. Spanish records, in my experience, are normally very good with more information than you find in some other countries. You also need to be aware of naming conventions, the child ...


3

You can request birth, marriage and death certificates to the Spanish Civil Registry. There are records since 1870. In your case, you will find the Civil Registry of O Porriño under Galicia, Pontevedra. The form has some mandatory fields like Tome, Page or Date of Event that you probably don't know. You can provide an approximate value for the Date and "...


3

Some ships were sent from Flanders to Scotland to return survivors back to Spain. A full account of the fate of survivors can be found in: The Downfall of the Spanish Armada in Ireland by Ken Douglas (Dublin : Gill & Macmillan, 2009). No names, only what happened to them.


3

In the city of Corella, province of Navarra, at 12 noon on 28th April 1944, before D. Santiago Frances Segura, Municipal Judge and D. Pablo Salvatierra Lara, Secretary, proceed to register the death of Da. Juana Sanz Cueva, born in Corella, province of Navarra, on 6th May 1857 (86 years old), daughter of D. Blas Sanz and Da. Felipa Cueva, resided at Tajadas ...


3

If I count correctly, there are five missing blocks: In the city of Corella, province of Navarra, at 12 noon on 28th April 1944, before D. Santiago [Frances Segura], Municipal Judge and D. Pablo [????? ?????], Secretary, proceed to register the death of Da. Juana Sanz Cueva, born in Corella, province of Navarra, on 6th May 1857 (86 years old), daughter ...


3

María's name may be María Mauricia (as in the Spanish Habsburg princess).


3

The previous answer is not fully correct, the very first place is "Graja de Iniesta" and not "GraNja". Granja means farm in Spanish and Graja is a bird species, that's why it might look more sensible to assume a place will be named "Graja". In order to determine better the names of localities I usually double check the names here. For the second location it ...


3

Algeria at the time was part of France. Algerian archives were only partially (about 60-70%) brought back to France when Algeria gained their independence in the 1960s. Whichever registers were brought back have been digitalized and put online for free on the ANOM website. Records prior to 1904 have been indexed, and records prior to 1918 are online. Births ...


3

I looked in FamilySearch and you have quite good resources to find. I would suggest to not start with the census, but with the cementry register, as you know around which date your great grandmother died. The list of resources in FamilySearch is this one: https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/results?count=100&placeId=1115843&query=%2Bplace%3A%...


3

When I have doubts between potential surnames due to the writing and there is no available second source, I try to look to statistics to the most probable surname. You can you to this webpage of statistics of names and surnames in Spain: https://www.ine.es/widgets/nombApell/index.shtml In our case and the different proposed wordings: Guillorme: there is ...


2

this is my guess: ..natural de Corella, vecina de Corella, hijo legítimo de D. Manuél Muñoz Guíllorme y de Dª Aurora Pérez Arellano y a Dª Teresa Marcilla _ienrolas, de Veintiseis años, de estado soltera, sus labores y que nació el día 1 de ... natural de: born place, vecida de: actual home, legítimo: born under marriage, estado soltera: single - not married,...


2

You don't say what exactly you are looking for with regards to information about your grandfather. A good place to start with is probably his birth certificate. This will list the names of his parents at the very least. You can get the birth certificate from the local registry office in Pontevedra. Once you have that, depending on the brevity of the ...


2

From what I understand of the paternity and sibling tests, because the mother of your potential half-siblings tested, the results should be certain (with a negligible uncertainty value). I would like to emphasize, though, that I'm not particularly knowledgable about this type of testing. If you are interested in finding out who your biological father is, I ...


2

Based on the comments provided I have come up with so far: Otros titulos o datos: Se practica en virtud de esta order recibida en el dia de hoy del juzgado de instrucción 1 dimanante del sumario 52 de 1965. Which translates as: Other titles or particulars: This is done by virtue of this order received today from the Court of Instruction 1 arising from ...


2

I think you have made a slip in your proposal: I suggest the correct reading is Otros titulos o datos: Se practica en virtud de carta orden recibida en el dia de hoy del juzgado de instrucción 1, dimanante del sumario 52 de 1965. "Carta Orden" is a Spanish legal term, it means "mandate" and then later "letter of authority" or ...


2

This is the transcription (I am also translating the "legal" spanish language): Other titles or data: (this certificate) is performed thanks to a letter received today from the court number 1 during summary 52 from 1965. In particular, the court they are referring to is a "juzgado de instrucción" which deals with criminal investigations....


2

For questions of "where do I locate X type of resource?" I like to use the FamilySearch Wiki. On the main page of the Wiki, you can use the map to identify a place to research, or you can use the search box to locate a place or topic. The page for Valencia, Spain describes how and where to find civil and church records. A sidebar on the Valencia ...


2

In Spain the local cemeteries are administered by the local council. Each town hall has an architect who is responsible for all mapping of the area. He is probably your best port of call. This is the website for Paterna Ayuntamiento website and as this is on the outskirts of Valencia city I am sure you will find that someone there will help. An alternative ...


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